People 'n' Issues

Non-profits falling behind in digital era

January 9th, 2017
Despite 98% of non-profits indicating that technology is very important to their operations, the sector still faces challenges to its digital transformation, compared to other industries, writes SIYA MADYIBI, Head of Corporate, External and Legal Affairs at Microsoft SA.
non-profit-organization

According to a recent survey conducted by Microsoft polling NGOs across South Africa, which found that the non-profit sector is fast having to play catch-up when it comes to fully embracing digital transformation.

Out of the 55 non-profits surveyed, only 12 said that 80 percent of their employees and field workers have access to devices, and 16 reported that their field workers are using technology to better serve their cause.

A lack of funding and poor internet connection were cited as the biggest barriers to adoption. Several respondents indicated that there was often an internal belief that technology is too expensive and they face challenges regarding weak team structures and collaboration, and restricted funding models.

Why non-profits need to digitally transform

Non-profits operate in much the same way as do big businesses and enterprise. Each tries to maximise a return on investment of often limited resources in order to satisfy the objectives of various stakeholders or customers.

Just as successful enterprises must constantly innovate to meet and shape customer preferences, so too do non-profits need to adapt to meet the demands of today’s digital world. Finding new and innovative ways to reach customers and shareholders, or beneficiaries and donors, is one area that both enterprises and non-profits respectively share.

In the survey, non-profits indicated that technologies like cloud computing can help them keep detailed databases of their beneficiaries, update records easily, search for records faster and back up information on servers that are not on their premises. Other respondents reported that they use mobile technology to capture and share pictures and reports for evidence of implementation. This allows their team to share progress with funders, opening doors for more funding.

Overcoming the obstacles

Organisations that are agile enough to effectively adapt will be well positioned for the future; those who aren’t, risk becoming redundant as new models emerge that better serve beneficiaries and match donor interests.

Rise the connected non-profit

Here’s how non-profits can digitally transform their organisations:

1.     Become a digital-first organisation

A digital-first organisation is one that embraces technology across business functions, rather than treating IT as a separate department.  It must become a culture that flows from top managers to all levels of the organisation, not just the IT department.

2.    Choose the right tools for the job

Traditionally non-profits have used a variety of disparate technologies to store, manage and analyse data. However, the emergence of cloud computing has unlocked a vital resource for addressing the world’s problems. Cloud services utilise data to create new insights and lead to breakthroughs, not just for science and technology, but for addressing the full range of economic and social challenges and the delivery of better human services. Cloud also improves communications and productivity, and is much more cost-effective than traditional software.

3.    All staff need to become digital staff

The reality is that digital intersects the work of all staff in any organisation. Non-profits need to create digitally-savvy, mobile workforces who are well equipped to flourish in a mobile-first, cloud-first world. They can do this by arming staff and field workers with adequate devices and equipping them with the necessary skills to serve the broader needs of the non-profit community and the beneficiaries they service.

At Microsoft we are committed to helping non-profits use cloud computing to solve basic human challenges. One of our ambitions for Microsoft Philanthropies is to partner with these groups and ensure that cloud computing is accessible to a greater number of people and meets the widest range of societal needs.

This is why Microsoft recently announced that it will be making Microsoft Azure available to eligible non-profit and non-governmental organisations, by offering Azure credits. This offer adds to the existing comprehensive suite of Microsoft cloud services that are available to non-profits to empower their missions.

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